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Veronika Doll, “A Lesson I Have Learned from a Witness Who Does Not Like to Remember”

I first met Vera Hodek [1] in 2011. I was finishing my research about Vincent Hodek – a Prague-born aircraft engineer and a Czechoslovakian immigrant who came to the United States in October 1966, bringing his wife Marie and daughter Vera.…

Jeff Turner, “Mormonism, ‘Asiatic’ Polygamy, and Immigration Regulation in 1891″

At the Value Voters Summit in fall 2016, American politician Gary Bauer offered a history lesson. Then-candidate Donald Trump had come under a storm of criticism for calling for a ban on Muslim immigration to the United States. Politicians from…

Alberto Wilson III, “Border Walls in a Globalized Age”

In November 2016, Tom Vanderbilt published an opinion piece in the New York Times titled, “The Walls in Our Heads.” Walls, he argued, rarely engender the expected outcomes of control but rather signal the erosion of state power. Vanderbilt suggested that…

Genevieve Carpio, “Teaching #ImmigrationSyllabus”

In the past year, there have been a series of #syllabi designed to provide a historical and theoretical context for critical social issues with deep historical roots in the United States, including #FergusonSyllabus, #CharlestonSyllabus, #BaltimoreSyllabus, and #StandingRockSyllabus. These syllabi and…

Patrick Lacroix, “Refugee Soldiers, American Patriots: Canadians in the Quest for Independence”

In the spring of 1775, Ethan Allen and his Green Mountains Boys surprised the small British garrison at Ticonderoga, a strategic point guarding the all-important hydrographic highway consisting of the Hudson River, Lake Champlain, and the Richelieu River in Canada.…

Marlene Epp, “Narrating the Canadian Mosaic: Immigration and Ethnicity in Canada / Immigration et ethnicité au Canada”

Canada has about 200 ethnic groups, according to the most recent national census. To write the individual histories of all of these groups is a daunting, probably impossible, task. In 1979 the Canadian Historical Association (CHA), with funding from what…

Stacy D. Fahrenthold, “Teaching Migrant and Refugee Histories in the Shadow of Trump”

There are numerous challenges facing historians of Middle Eastern migration at the moment. Trump’s promise to ban Muslims from travel to the United States has engendered an executive order that Trump’s administration variously claims is and is not a “ban.”…

Hidetaka Hirota, “No Frontiers but Those of Humanity Itself: Immigration Reform in Nineteenth-Century Massachusetts”

One of the most important developments in modern America is the widening gap between citizens and noncitizens. Citizenship status in many ways determines the rights and privileges of people in the United States today. But in the nineteenth century the…

Carl Lindskoog, “Writing Refugee History Amidst an Historic Refugee Crisis”

It was Tuesday, February 7. My four-year-old son and I were racing down Grand Central Parkway in Queens toward JFK airport. We were on our way to what we hoped would be a first meeting with a Syrian refugee family…

S. Deborah Kang, “The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954”

S. Deborah Kang, The INS on the Line: Making Immigration Law on the US-Mexico Border, 1917-1954 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017). In December 2014, I visited Friendship Park/El Parque de la Amistad, San Diego-Tijuana, to take photos for my…

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